Invasion of the Fly Maggot

Truly disgusting. Has anyone ever had anything like this happen before?

Mara and Anika awoke the other morning to dozens of maggots crawling down from the top floor towards the heat of the kitchen. Though they were promptly hoovered up there were more the next morning, and the next morning, though the waves of maggots are diminishing.

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We thought they could be wood worm at first – they look more like fly larvae. Perhaps there is a perishing rodent under the floor boards upstairs.

Pont Romain

This is an interesting site, a lonely Roman bridge that arches over a small gorge. Why it was built there is unclear. It bridges the river Blanque, a tributary of the Salz which feeds
Pont Romain
into Rennes-les-Bains. The bridge is built on limestone outcrops very high up above the river. After a few days of heavy rain the river can get very high (the hot spring in Rennes-les-Bains can get submerged) so the elevation of the bridge gives it long lasting protection. The old Roman bridge in Rennes was washed away in the 1992 flood. This bridge also succumbed during that year, and was rebuilt in 1993 by volunteers. It is a faithful reproduction. The question is why the need to cross the river right there, given the economic costs and technical skill needed to build it. The path is steep on both sides of the bridge, too steep for horses. The bridge is not wide enough for wagons either so one can discount its use as a trade bridge. Donkeys would have no problem. The nearest Roman town was Rennes-les-Bains. Perhaps there was a mine in the hills that used the bridge to get down to Rennes. Or a wealthy landowner built it for his cattle. Or else perhaps the hills behind it were once teeming with agriculture and the bridge was a last resort for crossing in bad weather.

The bridge, built of local stone effortlessly blends into the surroundings

The bridge, built of local stone effortlessly blends into the surroundings